49 thoughts on “RC Battlefield 1

  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    for the blimb you guys should have put balloons inside and filled them with helium and then when your done you pump out the heleum or just shoot it

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    When he said "Oh the humanity" it was a reference to that zeppelin i forgot the name of

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    WHY NOT USE HELIUM TO ACHIEVE NEUTRAL BUOYANCY FIRST AND USE MOTORS TO STEER ONLY?

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    WHY DID THEY PLAY KAZOO MUSIC? OVER 9 MILLION SOLDIERS, SAILORS, MARINES, AND PILOTS DIED IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR.

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    should have put long Helium balloon(s) in side the Zeppelin improves its ability to fly reducing it's weight or go traditional Hydrogen just my 2 cents

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    Remake it with more weight making it easier to handle or just remove 2 or 4 propellers if needed.

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    there's enough room in that Battlefield 1 blimp drone to make a DIY analog gyroscope just look it up

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    If you like planes, why not play War Thunder? You can use both planes AND tanks!

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    5/10 the zeppelin didn't turn into a flaming tornado

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    this is a completely accurate representation of the bf1 airship

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  • July 31, 2017 at 11:23 pm
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    There are "rigid" and "non-rigid" airships. "Non-rigid airships" would include things like blimps and hot-air balloons, where there is no internal supporting structure. These appear to be "deflated" when not in use; the only rigid parts are the gondola or car (or "basket" in the case of hot-air balloons). They don't carry much.

    RIGID airships, or "dirigibles" (diRIGIbles– "rigid" is partially incorporated in the name) have some sort of internal frame to support them. If they are not in use, they will continue to retain their cigar-shape look, for the most part. Some dirigibles only have an internal keel while the rest of the gas is in a partially deflate-able envelope; but the defining feature of a "Zeppelin-class" in particular is an entire internal skeleton that fully supports the outer skin, and thousands of smaller balloons, or "balloonets", are attached to the internal skeleton. If every single balloonet were deflated, you would not be able to tell since the internal frame continues to support the shape of the Zeppelin. Just about every rigid airship from before World War One until the Hindenburg was a Zeppelin type; the most ambitious Zeppelin designs were the USS Akron and USS Macon, which were US Navy flying aircraft carriers that held smaller biplanes in them.

    There are also "Aerostats" which look like dirigibles and have internal keels, but they are actually slightly heavier-then-air and rely on other means to help achieve lift: small winglets (sometimes even with helicopter rotors at the tips) or the lifting-body shape of the gas envelope when fully inflated. Aerostats right now are the cutting edge of dirigible tech at the moment and promise super cheap cargo movement.

    Sorry to be a nit-picking pedantic about it; I just dig dirigibles, especially Zeppelins.

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