28 thoughts on “How To Setup the Forge 3D Printer | Flite Test

  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    You should see SD cards programmed to print things like wings and such

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    Yes, more 3D printing videos would be great! Is this printer accurate enough to make parts that mate to the output shaft of a 9g servo? Those teeth are pretty tiny…

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    Hello flight test …Ur the best …..but can u try wooden PLA in this …..plz make a video ………

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    To cancel a print, don't turn it off, press the reset button behind the small hole on the front.

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    I got the Monoprice version of this when it was on sale for $260 around New Years. It worked right away but has a ton of little problems that should have been fixed at the factory before it was released for sale. The Z axis tower is wobbly and needs to be braced. The pulley under the front of the bed was mounted using the wrong kind of screw so it couldn't be tightened down so they put a nut on the inside which makes the belt be about 6mm out of alignment to the right. There are plans on Thingaverse to print a new bracket but just using the proper screw will fix that. The Cura software that came with the unit was an obsolete version in Chinese. It's the same version in English that you see in all the Youtube videos showing how to setup the unit but it's no longer supported by Cura since they have a new version that's totally different. The fan in the control box has bad bearings and is very noisy. They are reporting on the forums the connections on the control board for the heated bed are too small and tend to burn up but you can buy a heavy duty external controller from Banggood for $7 that can be installed to fix that. There was no damage to mine but I noticed the bed draws 20 Amps when it's heating up while the rest of the unit draws 3.5 Amps but the power supply is only rated for 20 Amps and will be overloaded. The bed is mounted on a thin piece of sheet metal that tends to bend down at the corners making the clearance hard to keep adjusted but you can buy a stiffer piece on Ebay for $15 or make one out of thicker metal that won't bend so easily. The oddest thing is the rod holding the spools of filament is too small and the bracket is too weak to hold up a spool! You'd think they would have checked that at the factory! I used a 6" piece of 1" plastic pipe to make a larger rod and added a second bracket at the outside end to hold it up. Monoprice has the best deal on filament though, just $19.95 per 1Kg spool. They have free shipping on orders over $50 and I got 15% off using code Maker15 so 3 spools cost just $51 with free shipping!

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    You should carry PETG, it's stronger than PLA, but prints as easily. Great for things that crash.

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    DO NOT turn off the printer and let it cool down, it will eventually clog the nozzle. Go to SD then click stop print. Then go to cool down under heat up pla. And if you have any questions just reply, thanks

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    COuld you guys start carrying some PETG? PETG is best for aircraft parts as it can handle temperature fluctuations better than PLA.

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    Says to turn it off… Don't turn it off when leveliing. You want to be at printing temperature when leveling the bed.

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  • June 21, 2017 at 11:07 am
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    I have three printers, all but one was a box of parts that had to be assembled piece by piece. After finishing assembly then the arduino board had to be downloaded with software code and fine tuned with a dial indicator on all axis. Only my FlashForge was plug and play. I use either Autocad or SketchUp to design parts which then go to Cura for slicing into g-code that the machine uses. I worked for National Oilwell Varco as a lead programmer machinist trainer, this is child's play compared to 9-axis dual spindle Mori-Seiki NTs, or Mazak Integrex.

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