31 thoughts on “Flite Test | Servos 101

  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    Still don't understand anything
    HTF CAN TIME CONTROL SERVO MOTOR?
    WTF IS KG/CM??? HOW CAN AN OBJECT THAT HAS ONE DIMENSION OF SPACE HAS MASS???

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    By making your distance = 1 [inch], it simplifies the calculation.
    The torque equation is:

    Torque = Force * Distance (T = F*d).

    Torque = Force * 1
    Torque = Force (force x 1 is equal to force)

    ** Do note, this is in units of [lbs-in], not [lbs-ft] of torque.**

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    For advice, don`t use analog and digital servos together because digital servo might “disturb“ the analog servo

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    How would you go about upgrading an analog servo system to digital? I'm assuming that the controller board would need to be flashed to send the correct signal?

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    i would have liked some info regarding the size of Servos. when choosing a servo based on physical size, are the dimenaions given on websites like hobbyking or banggood the hole to hole size, or the dimensions of the main casing?
    tia

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    This was very educational, thank you. But. When you did your 'torque' test, I think you misunderstand what torque is, you were just measuring the kg of force, or thrust. Torque, loosely speaking is the turning force on an object, not The force upon a specific point.

    However, I can see how your are just trying to make it easier to understand, so cheers!

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    i have a question
    same torque but different size servo
    which one better?
    for example a 17g with a 22g, but with same torque about 2.5kg
    which one is better?
    same results?
    thx

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks! Being a complete novice, this helps me a lot. Nicely done! (Peter – no need to talk so fast, Dude. Don't make it so people have to rewind. lol)

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    What is a good digital 9gram servo? (with metal gears maybe?) Are there any cheap options?

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    What would be a formula you would use to find how much torque need at a certain airspeed?

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    i own a 9 gram servo…just placing 2 more servo orders…hope to gather enough hardware to build my own foamy…😍am currently learning to read and understand c code in ide…also you can see my hobby… IG: codename.ide

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for the fantastic video! I've learned a lot from you two. I'm just getting into the hobby now and every little bit helps. You've inspired me put together a better power supply setup that will prevent the servos from browning out the receiver power in the event of low battery and/or overload. Cheers!

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    The servo torque is related to the gearing inside the servo and the supplied voltage. This torque will drop off as the supply voltage drops off as the battery is drained. However, the more interesting part is the use of mechanical advantage between the servo arm, rod and control horn for the surface, this is what really needs to be explained. As mechanical advantage is always a trade off between movement of the control surface versus servo resolution. Precision movement of the surface is desired without loosing too much resolution from the servo .

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    For my tricopters i only use Digital Servo. anything else Analog is good enought for me.

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    So if I were using 18-20 analog servos, what type of power supply should I use?

    Reply
  • July 30, 2017 at 11:18 pm
    Permalink

    This leaves a lot to be desired. Thrust is not torque. The torque of the servo does not change when you change the rod position, the thrust does. There seems to be a total lack of understanding of physics between these guys. Many other errors and misrepresentations in this piece as well.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *